22nd Annual Green Chemistry & Engineering Conference | June 18-20, 2018 | Portland, Oregon

Author Archive

The Next 10 years of Pharmaceutical Green Chemistry Session II

Wednesday, July 15

The ACS GCI Pharmaceutical Roundtable has the mission “to catalyze the implementation of green chemistry and engineering in the pharmaceutical industry globally”.  With broad membership across the sector, the Pharmaceutical Roundtable is celebrating its 10 year anniversary.  This special symposium will highlight key accomplishments over the last 10 years then look forward at key challenges for the next ten years, focusing on informing and influencing the research agenda, defining and delivering tools for innovation, educating leaders and collaborating globally.  Key research areas will be detailed with technical presentations from leaders in academia and industry.

Session Chair

Juan Colberg, Pfizer

Symposium Organizer

David Leahy, Bristol-Myers Squibb Chemical Development

Sustainable Separation Processes: Designing low energy intensity alternatives

Thursday, July 16

Energy cost and availability is leading to an expansion of chemical manufacturing in the United States.  This new manufacturing capacity presents an urgent and unique window of opportunity to design, demonstrate, and advance greener innovative processes to ensure long term sustainability. The chemical industry is among the top few consumers of energy in the U.S. economy, using 3,000 TBtu/year, with over a third attributed to separations by distillation.  Reducing the energy required to effect the separations is at the heart of virtually all chemical processes and fundamental to assuring the sustainability of the chemical enterprise. This session will highlight current efforts to design and implement low energy intensity separations processes. Instead of relying on traditional thermally driven processes and relative volatility, we envision full exploration of intrinsic molecular properties such as shape, size, dipole moment, polarizability, charge, chemical reactivity, or pairwise interactions (inter-molecular and molecular-material) to drive separations. Can there be a logical basis where intrinsic molecular properties can define the most sustainable method for separation (adsorption, membranes, crystallization, liquid extraction etc.)? Further, broadly accessible properties databases and simulation tools are lacking which prevent large scale industrial adoption.  Abstracts are encouraged, but not limited to, the following subject areas: Mapping out molecular properties, creating properties databases, predictive tools, resources and computational modeling approaches for sustainable separations. Innovative separations processes, simulation, design and examples of innovative properties driven separations. Systems design: Novel and current processes for low energy intensity separations.  Material-molecular interactions – chemistry of the separation media and its design for energy efficient separations. Separations in the presence of external fields. Strategy for successful industrial implementation of new Sustainable Separations Processes.

Session Chair

Amit Sehgal, Solvay

Symposium Organizer

David Leahy, Bristol-Myers Squibb Chemical Development

Joe Stanzione, Rowan University

Biorenewable Feedstocks

Thursday, July 16

Sustainable feedstocks focuses on the development of low cost and widely available feedstocks and intermediate chemicals from renewable resources (i.e., woody biomass, crop residues, nonfood crops with low impact on food sources), particularly focus on chemicals and resins derived from plant oils, proteins, lignin, bio chars, carbohydrates. We invite abstracts and presentations with a scope of developing sustainable feedstocks, converting and biorefining feedstocks into intermediate chemicals that are critical for sustainable polymers with potential uses for plastics, adhesives, resins, coatings, foams, composites, and or high performance structural materials, etc.

Session Chair

Joe Stanzione, Rowan University

Symposium Organizer

Xiuzhi Susan Sun, Kansas State University

Poster Session

Posters submitted to this session will be reviewed based on the following criteria: meets the definition of Green Chemistry or Green Engineering; Potential impact on the field, Development of idea, Originality, Conclusions supported by data.

Safer Reagents for Synthesis

Wednesday, July 15

Safer reagents for synthesis is fundamental in employing Green Chemistry and Engineering in chemical synthesis across all disciplines. The 3rd, 4th and 5th Principles of Green Chemistry (Less Hazardous Chemical Syntheses, Designing Safer Chemicals and Safer Solvents and Auxiliaries) widely covers this topic. Challenges include, but are not limited to, development of safer and more efficient chemical reactions utilizing less hazardous and safer reagents. Abstracts are encouraged, but not limited to, the following subject areas: Research advances in safer reagents for synthesis, Use of kinetic analysis to elucidate mechanistic understanding and drive more efficient and safer synthesis, Greener technologies enabling safer reactive chemistry at large scale, Advances on greener/safer ingredients for the design of more sustainable consumer products, Greening the chemical supply chain with safer reagents for hydraulic fracturing, Safer Green chemistry & engineering applications in the pharmaceutical industry, formulated consumer products industry, chemical manufacturing, or hydraulic fracturing.

Session Chair

Ettigounder “Samy” Ponnusamy, Sigma-Aldrich

Symposium Organizer

Bruce Lipshutz, University of California, Santa Barbara

David Leahy, Bristol-Myers Squibb Chemical Development

Poster Session

Posters submitted to this session will be reviewed based on the following criteria: meets the definition of Green Chemistry or Green Engineering; Potential impact on the field, Development of idea, Originality, Conclusions supported by data.

 

Alternative Reaction Media

Organic solvents constitute the bulk of the waste generated from many manufacturing processes.  Although this solvent waste is typically environmentally unfriendly or toxic, recent attention has been geared toward the use of ‘greener’ organic solvents as the reaction media for a variety of chemical transformations.  This session will feature recent advances in this area, including transformations that perform in green organic solvents, water, or mixed green organic/aqueous solvent systems. Expected participants/ contributors:  Academic speakers (faculty, postdocs, students) who have developed new methodologies that perform well in ‘green’ organic solvents or water, Industrial speakers who have implemented and championed the use of ‘green’ organic solvents in medicinal chemistry, Industrial representatives who have developed scalable chemical processes that use ‘green’ solvents or water, Representatives from regulatory agencies who can discuss the importance and future directions of ‘green’ organic solvents in chemical manufacturing.

Session Chair

Neil Garg,  University of California, Los Angeles

Symposium Organizer

Bruce Lipshutz, University of California, Santa Barbara

David Leahy, Bristol-Myers Squibb Chemical Development

Strategic, Sustainable Chemistries for Functional Materials Session I

Thursday, July 16

Toward sustainable materials chemistry:  Solution-based, additive approaches to inorganic thin films.  This session will highlight research and innovation on inorganic complexes, clusters and nanoparticles and the chemistry that makes them useful as solution-based precursors for thin film formation.

Session Chair

May Nyman, Oregon State University

Symposium Organizer

Jim Hutchison, University of Oregon

Poster Session

Posters submitted to this session will be reviewed based on the following criteria: meets the definition of Green Chemistry or Green Engineering; Potential impact on the field, Development of idea, Originality, Conclusions supported by data.

Strategic, Sustainable Chemistries for Functional Materials Session II

Thursday, July 16

Toward sustainable materials chemistry:  Solution-based, additive approaches to inorganic thin films. This session will highlight research and innovation on inorganic complexes, clusters and nanoparticles and the chemistry that makes them useful as solution-based precursors for thin film formation.

Session Chair

David Marsh, University of Oregon

Symposium Organizer

Jim Hutchison, University of Oregon

Biobased Plastics and Composites

Tuesday, July 14

Sustainable materials focuses on the development of biobased polymers and composites derived from renewable resources (lignin, cellulose, proteins, starch, plant oils, crops, natural fibers, etc.) with minimal energy requirements, while avoiding negative impacts on human health and the environment. Applications to plastics, adhesives, composites, resins, foams, engineered structures and other materials are invited with a scope that spans the design and manufacturing of non-toxic material properties to the biorefining and genetic engineering of renewable resources.  This session will specifically address biobased plastics and composites.

Session Chair

John Lascala, United States Army Research  Laboratory

Symposium Organizer

Joe Stanzione, Rowan University

Poster Session

Posters submitted to this session will be reviewed based on the following criteria: meets the definition of Green Chemistry or Green Engineering; Potential impact on the field, Development of idea, Originality, Conclusions supported by data.

Going Green With Continuous Chemistry

Thursday, July 16

Continuous processing is well known as a means of improving the safety profile for a given manufacturing process while at the same time increasing  materials efficiency.   In fact, many   industries have routinely adopted continuous processing.   This session will focus on novel continuous chemistry designed to improve process safety and efficiency.  Papers for this session should address: New chemistries which are operated optimally in continuous flow mode.  Case studies with a focus on process safety and material efficiency. Comparative analyses of different metrics that highlight sustainability. Useful comparative metrics include Process Mass Intensity (PMI) and Global Warming Potential (kg / CO2 eq.)

Session Chair

Mike Kopach, Eli Lilly

Symposium Organizer

David Leahy, Bristol-Myers Squibb

Joe Stanzione, Rowan University

Knowledge and Tools to Evaluate Alternatives

Tuesday PM
June 17, 2014

Speakers

George Daston
Procter & Gamble Global Product Stewardship
“Cheminformatic approaches for toxicity prediction”

Daniel Chang
US EPA National Exposure Research Laboratory; North Carolina State University
“Rapid in silico methods to characterize and predict ADME properties for chemical toxicity and exposure prioritization”

Douglas Parsons
US Environmental Protection Agency
“Showcase of ChemView: EPA’s online database to access information under the Toxic Substances Control Act”

Joel Tickner
University of Massachusetts Lowell
“Functional Use: An underappreciated foundational concept in advancing safer chemistry”

Caroline Baier-Anderson
US Environmental Protection Agency
“Incorporating SAR and high-throughput screening data into alternatives assessment: Challenges and opportunities”

Jennifer McPartland
Environmental Defense Fund; Johns Hopkins University
“Developing systematic review approaches for mechanistic data and the relevance to chemical alternatives assessment”

Lauren Heine
Clean Production Action GreenScreen Program
“Using Chemical Hazard Assessment for Informed Substitution: Applications of GreenScreen for Safer Chemicals”

Session Organizer:

Adelina Voutchkova-Kostal, George Washington University

Session Moderator:

Elaine Cohen Hubal, US EPA

ACS Green Chemistry Institute®

1155 16th Street NW
Washington, DC 20036
T: (202) 872-6102
www.acs.org/gci
Conference Email:
[email protected]

Stay Current


Privacy Policy: We will never share your email with anyone, ever.

Add to your Calendar

June 18 - 20, 2018
Hilton Portland Downtown
Portland, Oregon
USA